A Small Story About Caring

About 10 years ago, back when I was playing World of Warcraft still, I was hanging around Orgimmar, as people often do, when a message came over the trade chat from one of the server's top guilds. It was odd because there was an actual rule in their guild that they couldn't get into conversations with people on trade chat usually, so when I saw the name I was confused. And for a moment the endless barrage of trade chat messages stopped. The rest of the server was as surprised as me. It read: something like:

"Two weeks ago we experienced a great loss in our Guild. One of our original members has passed away. We will be having a service in honor of our friend today, we will be starting in Thunderbluff at Elder Rise where the officers will say a few words and then we will march to the Zepplin to Orgimmar and end in the Valley of Honor where for the last time, he will log off. We ask that you respect what we are doing and leave the throughway as clear as possible for his service."

It was in a couple hours. Everyone was talking about it. Someone asked if others might attend. And the answer was yes. So, a lot of us actually did, myself included. I don't remember what his friends said on Elder Rise specifically, but they had all met in 2001 when World of Warcraft first launched and they recalled the importance of his contribution to the guild and also his friendship. Then we walked to the Zepplin, lead by the dead man himself, which was quite odd. I don't remember his name but I remember he was a Tauren Warrior. They had him in his best armor and his Guild tabard which was dyed black, from its usual royal blue and gold. We boarded the Zepplin. All maybe 100 of us.

Then, once in Orgrimmar we walked through the Valley of Strength and The Drag and into the Valley of Heroes (Which was clear, as they had requested).

 Credit: Activison 

Credit: Activison 

Then we went all the way to the Hall of the Brave. Whoever was playing the dead man's account stopped in the entrance, turned to face us, and started the log off timer. I stayed the whole 20 seconds, which felt long, and then he was gone. And most of the observers mounted up and left.

 Credit: Activison

Credit: Activison

I think, often when I talk about video games I talk about everything wrong with the community. The ugliness of it all. But, I have experienced great caring among gamers. Here is one example, both in the Guildmates who had organized the whole ordeal and the server which showed their respect. I think it's important to remember that even though there's a screen and space between us that we are, at its simplest, humans interacting with each other and we are all capable of caring and respect. 

Which is ultimately why I demand it in the first place.